The abundance of automated defibrillators in Japan

The first time I saw an Automated External Defibrillator, AED for short, was in Japan. An AED is a machine designed to help people who are suffering from a heart attack. While waiting for an ambulance, bystanders can fetch the machine, connect the electrodes to the patient and the machine will automatically determine if it is necessary to administer an electric shock. It is important to note though, that CPR (resuscitation) remains vital. AEDs are designed to be used together with CPR.

philips heartstart AED

The Philips Heartstart AED

philips heartstart AED placement of electrodes

Electrodes are placed on the patient and the machine determines if an electric shock should be administered

While we have AEDs in Belgium as well, they seem to be few and well hidden. In Japan on the other hand, AEDs are everywhere. And there are clear signs indicating where the AEDs are. Have a look at this map, giving an overview of all AEDs in Atsuta Jingu park in Nagoya:

a map of all available AEDs in Atsuta jingu in Nagoya, Japan

A map of all available AEDs in Atsuta shrine in Nagoya, Japan. The hearts indicate the location of the AEDs. I count four AEDs in this park alone. Amazing!

AED in Japan

A clearly visible AED near the entrance of the toilets in a shopping centre in Japan. There is a flashlight on top of it. I wonder how it is activated. Are there buttons throughout the shopping centre that activate the flashlight and thus guide you to the AED?

One might argue that this abundance of AEDs is due to Japan’s ageing population. Belgium however also has an ageing population, yet AEDs are not omnipresent. Personally, I attribute the availability of AEDs in Japan to Japan’s concern with safety (安全 anzen). The lengths that Japanese people and authorities go through to ensure safety in all possible situation is impressive. Japan is covered with signs warning you about all possible dangers. ‘Anzen’ (safety) is a word that I quickly learned while living in Japan!

What do you think about AEDs in Japan? Do you also find there are so many of them? Why do you think that is?

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Japanese women don’t put their purse on the ground

Have you ever noticed that Japanese women never put their purse on the ground? It seems like a pretty straightforward thing but it really drew my attention in Japan. When Japanese women are in a café or restaurant, they will sit a bit forward on their chair and place their purse behind them on the chair, rather than placing it on the ground. The give up the comfort of resting against the back of the chair, to ensure their purse keeps clean. Taking into account this preference, many establishments provide special baskets for women to place their purse in. Very considerate and an excellent example of Japanese customer service.

Japanese purse baskets

The woman on the left has placed her purse behind her on the chair. Below the chairs are suspended baskets, intended as a place to keep your purse.

japanese purse basket

Another café where they offer a convenient basket to keep your purse off the ground.

Only when I started noticing the Japanese habit of never putting their purse on the ground, did I start thinking about how Belgian women do put their purse on the ground sometimes and how dirty that actually is. Since then, I take care to never place my own purse on the ground.

This Japanese purse etiquette is a good illustration of the importance of cleanliness and purity in Japanese culture. When it comes to daily habits, I find the Japanese often have very sensible views on cleanliness. After I left Japan, it took some getting used to a few ‘dirty’ Belgian habits again, like wearing shoes inside the house and shaking hands with strangers.

 

Heating the outdoors

Customer service is extremely important in Japan. Sometimes this leads to situations that seem a bit excessive in my eyes, like the amount of packaging they use or that time we saw a heater placed outside in the open air, to accommodate waiting customers.

open air heater in Japan

A kerosene burner placed outside in the open air to help customers waiting to have lunch stay warm

In Japan, it is very popular to eat out for lunch. Since many restaurants have only very limited seating space, it is common to have to wait for a table at a good restaurant. If the restaurant is really small, it doesn’t have an indoor waiting area and customers have to wait outside. One cold January day around noon, we were waiting to have lunch at a restaurant in Hakone. There was a waiting area next to the restaurant, i.e. outdoors. To my great surprise, the staff had placed a kerosene burner in the waiting area. Although I was very thankful for this extra heat (it was so cold!), at the same time I felt a bit guilty about taking advantage of something that somehow felt a bit wasteful. The heater was pretty much attempting to heat the entire outdoors, which is of course futile. There was no tent, no enclosure, nothing that could even barely attempt to keep a bit of the heat localised.

outside heater in Japan

Such a cold day!

After having discussed the situation with some Belgian friends, they pointed out that in Belgium sometimes we also make a bonfire outdoors or restaurants place heaters on their terrace in winter to enable people to sit outdoors. While this is true, I still felt an initial shock at seeing this heater in Japan. It is not the first time that I have felt torn between my love of Japanese customer service and my desire to not be wasteful. I would love to hear about other people’s experiences and opinions on the matter! Have you ever felt the same? How do you deal with these things? Or is it a non-issue?

Japan in a word: Senri no michi… – Even a road of a thousand miles…

I recently learned the Japanese saying ‘Even a road of thousand miles begins with a single step’. In Japanese it reads ‘Senri no michi mo ippo kara/ 千里の道も一歩から。’ I picked it up watching the dorama ‘Massan’ that is currently airing on NHK.

massan NHK Japanese dorama

The title image for the dorama ‘Massan’. It’s about a foreign woman who marries a Japanese man and follows him to Japan. It is set in the 1920’s.

We are currently in that time of year where everyone evaluates the past year and makes plans for the coming year. In that context, the saying seems especially appropriate. No matter what difficulties we might be facing, if we just focus on taking step after step, we will steadily advance and eventually overcome them.

This idea of not giving up despite adversity and thus overcoming the difficulties in one’s life is a recurring theme in many Japanese dorama (soap opera) and anime. The optimism and perseverance that many anime characters display often inspires me.

The saying especially reminded me of the anime Hajime no Ippo. It tells the story of a boy, named Ippo, who is bullied at school, but finds confidence and a sense of purpose when he joins a boxing gym. As he climbs the ranks in the boxing community, every new fight poses a challenge for which he has to give his all. While I had no previous interest in boxing whatsoever, the anime was so captivating that I really became interested in boxing.

hajime no ippo japanese anime

This is the main character of the anime ‘Hajime no Ippo’. He looks fierce when fighting, but otherwise he is a very good-hearted guy.

The title of the anime ‘Hajime no Ippo’ is a play on words that also refers back to the saying of ‘senri no michi mo ippo kara’. Since the name of the main character is Ippo, the title may refer to ‘the beginning of (the story of) Ippo’. But it could also mean ‘the first step(s)’.

So let’s take inspiration from this beautiful saying and consider every new day a chance to take our own (first) steps on the road that lies ahead of us.

senri no michi mo ippo kara

A calligraphy of the Japanese saying ‘senri no michi mo ippo kara’ – ‘Even a road of a thousand miles begins with a single step’. You read the calligraphy from top to bottom and from right to left.

Japanese customer service: boxes and bags

The Japanese are masters of customer service. Shops are always thinking of new ways to make things more convenient for their customers. A good example of this is when we bought our rice cooker. It was a heavy machine in a big box. Rather than giving us a giant plastic bag, they attached a handle to the plastic wire around the box, which made it super easy to carry. I’d never seen such a thing in Belgium. Ah, the wonders of Japan!

Japanese box carrying device

Convenient handle for carrying boxes. So much easier and sturdier than a giant plastic bag!

Japanese box carrying device

Here’s a cute couple that happened to stumble into one of my pictures, carrying a box with a similar contraption.

There is something else that almost all shops do: when they give you a plastic bag, they attach a piece of tape below the handle to keep the bag closed. It makes the bag a lot easier to handle, especially when you are carrying several bags and are still trying to shop at the same time. Japanese people are so thoughtful!

taping the bag for convenience in Japan

Closing the shopping bag with a piece of tape makes it easier to carry and prevents object from falling out in case of vigorous movement.

taping the bag for convenience in Japan

Close up of the ingenious little piece of tape. It’s all in the details!

Some attentive readers pointed out that the purpose of the little piece of tape is also to prove that the product was paid for and to prevent theft by making it difficult to add unpaid items to the bag later on. Thank you everyone, for contributing and teaching me new things about Japan! 🙂

Cute Japanese roadblocks

When we were driving around Kyoto, we saw the cutest little roadblocks. They were shaped like frogs. While Belgian roadblocks are just functional and boring looking, the Japanese never pass up an opportunity to make something look cute. We were surprised and fascinated to suddenly see these funny frog-roadblocks while entering Kyoto. In Japan you never know what you’ll see next!

 

cute japanese roadblocks frogs

Imagine just driving down the road and suddenly seeing these guys staring at you.

cute japanese roadblocks frogs

A close-up of the frog-roadblocks

Japan is all about ‘cute’, or ‘kawaii’ as they call it. Grown adults, children, elderly people, they all engage in the cult of kawaii. When even the most serious of objects gets a touch of kawaii, it often leads to slightly comical scenes (for the Western beholder at least). But the cult of kawaii it is one the very typical things that make Japan what it is, and I am both fascinated and delighted by it.

cute japanese roadblocks paramedics

Here is another kind of Japanese roadblock that we saw on the same road. I am not sure if they are supposed to be paramedics (a bit ominous, don’t you think?) or just safety workers of some kind, urging us to be safe.

Japanese love hotels

Love hotels are abundant in Japan. This is largely due to the lack of privacy that is part of daily life in Japan. The walls of some appartements are paper-thin, multi-generational living is quite common and many people still pretend that they don’t have sex before marriage.

This implies that love hotels are by no means only for people who are conducting illicit affairs. A lot of people who visit Japanese love hotels are legitimately together, or even married. Many couples just want to enjoy themselves without having to worry about the children or the neighbours overhearing them.

Nevertheless, Japanese love hotels are all about privacy. The one I visited had screens between parking places and wooden signs to cover the license plate of your car, in case someone you know were to visit the same hotel.

Japanese love hotel privacy

Screen partitions between the cars and boards to cover the license plate for privacy

The entrance of the hotel was through the parking garage, to further reduce the chance of anyone seeing you. Everything was very dimly lit, which made taking pictures a bit difficult. I hereby apologize for the quality of the photographs.

Japanese love hotel entrance

The dimly lit entrance to a Japanese love hotel

Once inside, I was surprised by how nice everything looked. Nothing sleazy about it. In fact, it was nicer than some of the ryokan where we sometimes stayed during travelling. I have heard stories about foreigners using love hotels during their touristic travels when all the other hotels in a city were booked full, as can happen for example during golden week, or autumn leaves season in Kyoto.

Japanese love hotel lobby

What a gorgeous lobby! Not at all what I expected from a love hotel.

Inside there is a waiting area, in case you and your lover are arriving in separate cars. Of course the waiting area is nicely partitioned off, again to ensure privacy. Every waiting cubicle has a letter, so you can text your lover to tell them in which cubicle you are waiting. There is also a small ‘bar’, in reality more like a self-service drinks station. Overall, it’s all very nice, anonymous and welcoming. I’ve said it many times, and I’ll say it again: the Japanese are masters of customer service.

Japanese love hotel waiting area

Private waiting area to meet up with your lover, with a letter to indicate each cubicle. Of course the door can be closed, so that nobody sees you.

Japanese love hotel waiting area tv

There is even a tv in the waiting area.

Japanese love hotel bar

A self-service bar. All the drinks are free.

When you have met up with your lover, it’s time to book a room. There is a screen that shows all the rooms. The ones that are available, are lit up. At the time we were there, which was a Tuesday afternoon around 3 p.m., there were not many rooms left. I was amazed to see so many rooms in use on a weekday afternoon. Don’t these people have jobs or something?

Japanese love hotel rooms overview

An overview of the rooms in the hotel. All the dark pictures are occupied rooms. I am not sure what the red lights on some of the rooms mean though. Perhaps that they are freeing up soon?

Japanese love hotel rooms detail

A more detailed image of the room information

Prices differ per room and also depend on how long you want to stay. There are two possibilities: you can just have a ‘rest’, which according to the hotel’s website is 4 to 5 hours during the day or 2 hours at nighttime, which starts after midnight; or you can have a proper ‘stay’, which is roughly from 9 p.m. until 11 a.m the next day, on weekends. Weekdays have several different plans for a ‘stay’.

Judging from the pictures, the rooms look very nice and seem quite spacious as well. Or is that just the camera angle? Unfortunately we didn’t have a chance to go up to the rooms. I was there with a (girl)friend, who took me to the love hotel in a spur of the moment, crazy impulse to satisfy my curiosity about every aspect of life in Japan. And of course we had a good laugh along the way! But unfortunately my curiosity wasn’t strong enough to make me spend 6500 yen just to have a quick look at one of the rooms.

Once you’ve made your choice, you can input the room number of your choice on a computer screen. There is a an elevator in the corner to take you up. Very sleek, efficient and anonymous.

Japanese love hotel front desk

The front desk where you input your room of choice. The telephone connects you to an employee if you have any questions.

I made a little video to give you a tour of the lobby of the love hotel. This particular hotel was ‘Hotel Siesta Togo’ near Toyota City (between Toyota City and Nagoya).

If you want to know more about love hotels in Japan and specifically the Nagoya area, I refer you to this interesting article about love hotels in Nagoya’s Magazine. It provides some general background on the love hotel culture in Japan and recommends some love hotels in the Nagoya area.